The Nadel family- Enjoy reading our everyday adventures!


Tuesday, November 8, 2011

Benefits of growing as a kid...

In our home, there are several benefits to turning five. Our kids each had to stay in their bed to rest/ nap each day until they turned five years old. After their fifth birthday, then the child was allowed to play quietly in their room (so others could still rest). But no more naps is not all...

Another benefit is that they get to have sleepovers! We do not let our wee ones have a friend for the night until they are five years old. This also goes for going to a cousin or friends' house. I want them to be able to verbalize if they feel sick, need something, get upset, and just overall be non-babyish. So we restrict their sleepovers until age five, and then just one friend at a time until age 8 or 9. We have to know the parents well and trust that they will be honorable in their behavior to our child. There are too many unknowns with strangers, or relative strangers. I'd rather have kids to our home anytime, as a form of protection...

Also beginning at age five, our kids receive an allowance. Allowance in our home is not based upon chores, but because you live here. Our kids are expected to do their chores, or we may withhold food. We've often said to them, "The Bible says, "He who does not work, should not eat.'" (2 Thess. 3:10) We give allowance to our kids based upon age, and they receive it two times a month, since that is how my hubby is paid.
Caleb's empty bins- must be the end of the month!

Here is our "system":
Mallory is five years old, so she gets $2.50/ month, or $1.25 on the 15th and 30th/ 1st of the month.

Caleb is eight years old, so he gets $4.00/ month, or $2.00 on the 15th & 30th.

Rebekah is 12 years old, so she gets $6.00/month, or $3.00 two times a month.

We have given them each three small bins to keep their money in, as well as a wallet. The labeled bins are for saving, spending and giving to God. They need to give an offering to God at church, so they take a portion (roughly 10% or more) for the offering plate. If they want something big, they need to save for it. This teaches them to save, which is a wonderful thing for kids to learn while they are young. We also try to deposit some $$ in their savings account a few times a year, even if it is only a few dollars each time. Then they have the rest for spending.

If we go to the store, they've learned to take their own money. If they ask for something, they know I'll say, "Did you bring your money?" If not, I usually tell them no. If so, we decide if that is something that they can purchase, taking into account the tax for the item. I try not to loan them money too often, because I want them to learn to bring their money with them when we shop.

In addition to these benefits, there are a few added jobs. Each child has a daily chore and a weekly chore. My older daughter empties and reloads the dishwasher each morning. My son collects trash from the 9 trashcans daily. My 5-year-old daughter sweeps the kitchen floor each morning, a new job upon turning age five. They usually do not perform these jobs on Sundays, our day of rest.  Their weekly jobs are: cleaning the bathrooms (Rebekah), sweeping the floor (Caleb) and washing the windows/ glass doors and mirrors (Mallory). My youngest sometimes helps put the silverware away, which is a great sorting activity!

Of course, they are also expected to keep their bedrooms clean, make their beds (at least sometimes!), and care for the chickens. We are thinking of changing Rebekah's allowance when she turns 13, so she will need to buy her own toiletries...

Then at age six, when they can write a little better, they can begin to answer the phone. But that's another year away...

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